Grant FAQ

Welcome to the 2024 Community Impact Grant FAQ Page. On this page, you'll be able to submit questions for grant support, review common definitions, see examples of outcomes & indicators and more. 
Please bookmark this page, as this is where you will find questions posted with the answers.

 

Grant Guidance Support

In 2024, UWFC staff will be providing questions regarding grant guidelines via written format. Questions and answers will be posted on the website for all applicants to review. We are unable to answer questions specific to your organization or budget. This does not apply to technical support. 

Questions Submitted By:

Posted Answers On or Before: 

Monday, July 29th

Wednesday, July 31st

Friday, August 2nd

Wednesday, August 7th

Friday, August 23rd

Wednesday, August 28th

Please submit your question via the form below. 
Updated: 7/23/2024 
            No Current Question Submissions 

 

This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

1 + 5 =
Solve this simple math problem and enter the result. E.g. for 1+3, enter 4.

SHARED EXPECTATIONS. SHARED OUTCOMES. SHARED IMPACT.

 

When collected and used effectively, shared outcomes can help supporters work collaboratively with organizations to:

  1. Measure and clearly articulate that they are making the difference intended for the people they serve.
  2. Implement ongoing quality improvement at the programmatic level; and
  3. Inform stakeholders and the community on where and why programming is working or not working and how they are working to improve it.
  4. Empower others to advocate on the program's behalf by having readily available "talking points." 

 

 At the end of this page, you will see expanding sections for the areas of Health, Education & Financial Stability.While agencies are encouraged to use the following Shared Outcomes when requesting funding, United Way also recognizes that there is never a one-size fits all approach, nor is it all inclusive of the work being done in Freeborn County. Agencies are invited to use the following Indicators to help write their own Program Outcomes & Indicators for the 2024 Grant Cycle if there is one that does not accurately reflect your program's work.
Please note: the application does ask for the primary Impact area, chosen outcomes & indicators should align with this impact area chosen. 

 

Agency/Organization/Nonprofit:
For the purposes of this United Way, these three terms are used interchangeably to define a collective group that is tax exempt and eligible for funding that has a defined community benefit in the areas of Health, Education and Financial Stability in Freeborn County.

Program:

Organized activities and actions that utilize resources to produce desired outcomes. Programs exist within an organization. United Way funds programs, and not agencies as a whole.

Indicators:

The specific items of data that are tracked to measure how well a program is achieving an outcome. This does not have a specific measurement at the start of the program, it is defining what will be measured.

Targets: 

Objectives for a program’s level of achievement.

Outputs:

The direct products of program operation and usually are measured in terms of the volume of work accomplished—for example, the numbers of classes taught, counseling sessions conducted, educational materials distributed, and participants served. Outputs have little inherent value in themselves. They are important because they are intended to lead to a desired benefit for participants or target populations.

Outcomes: 

The benefits or changes for individuals or populations during or after participating in program activities. They are influenced by a program’s outputs. Outcomes may relate to knowledge, attitudes, values, skills, behavior, condition or other attributes. They are what participants know, think or can do; or how they behave; or what their condition is, that is different following the program.

For example, in a youth development program that creates internship opportunities for high school youth, an outcome might be that participants develop expanded views of their career options. An indicator of how well the program is succeeding on this outcome could be the number and percent of participants who list more careers of interest to them at the end of the program than they did at the beginning of the program. A target might be that 40 percent of participants list at least two more careers after completing the program than they did when they started it.

Budget Help

United Way has developed this page to provide technical assistance to programs submitting grant proposals, particularly small and grassroots organizations who may not have experience submitting a program budget in the past. These guidelines may also be useful for programs and agencies who have not previously applied for United Way funding, or for agencies that plan to create a new program with United Way funding.

Program Budget:

We request programs to submit a program budget to the funding review team, but we do not have a set format in which we require this information. If your program already has a budget, stop here and submit that with your grant proposal - there is no need to create new work for yourself! If your program is starting from scratch, you can download the budget template here.

Income:

UWOC Request is the dollar amount you are requesting from United Way in your proposal. This is an annual amount.

Other UW refers to any United Way funding you receive through designations through our workplace campaigns. It is not the same as grant money you receive from UWOC.

Earned Income is generated by providing services or goods. Examples could include fees paid by participants, fundraising sales, renting out space, etc.

In-Kind Donations can be hard to quantify. They are donations that your programs receive that they otherwise would have paid out of pocket. For example, if you planned to rent a bus to transport students to an event but the rental company let you rent for free, you value the in-kind donation by how much money you saved. Frequent in-kind donations are technology, office equipment, meeting space, and marketing. Volunteer time counts as in-kind if it is operational (accounting, training, etc.) but is not in-kind if the volunteer is providing direct services.

Expenses:

Direct Services Personnel includes the wages and benefits of the individuals who do the on-the-ground work with program participants.

Grants to Individuals account for money that 'passes through' your organization to program participants. Examples could be the money that was paid out as rent assistance, the portion of the participation fee that was paid by your agency, tuition scholarships to students, etc.

Contract Services are those instances in which you pay another agency or company for services. Common examples are consultants, researchers, legal and accounting services, or office equipment maintenance.

Program Supplies are those supplies needed by the program, such as books, art supplies, sports equipment, etc. that are used by program participants and staff.

Advertising and Promotion can include the cost of social media advertisements, newspaper listings, billboards, radio spots, and TV commercials.

Office Expenses are those supplies such as paper, pens, paper clips, and so on. Often, these are not purchased by the program specifically, but by the agency. Your program's office expenses may be calculated as a certain percentage of your agency's office expenses, as long as the organizational and program budget line up. Don't forget to include utilities!

Information Technology can include software subscriptions and technology purchases.

Travel/Mileage is the amount reimbursed to employees for travel outside of their normal commute, the current rate is 56¢/mile.  It can also cover the costs of hotels, car rental, fuel for rental vehicles, and airplane tickets.

Administration/Overhead are expenses for your overall operations and management - for example, costs of Board of Director meetings and centralized services such as office management and human resources. 

Technical Grant Support

Support for the grant application process is handled in two ways: clarification on the grant questions and technical support.

All applicants are highly encouraged to log in and review the grant materials within the first two weeks of the grant cycle.

  • It is best practice to answer your questions in a word document to ensure work is not lost due to technical issues. You may then copy and paste your answers into the grant form itself.
  • Technical assistance will be provided via virtual office hours each Friday from 2:00-3:00 starting August 2nd   
  • No phone calls will be accepted for grant or technical support. An email may be sent requesting a phone call if necessary to uwfc@unitedwayfc.org but should only be utilized as a last resort.

If technical difficulties are unable to be resolved, please notify UWFC staff and an alternate method of submitting the grant application will be provided.
 

 

Choose Session to Attend
Please detail the issue you are having. Staff will look into the issue and if possible will attempt to have a resolution prior to the office hours, depending on capacity. 

INDICATORS

 

Direct Supports and Services

# of children served (0-5) enrolled in high-quality early childhood programs 

# of children served receiving literacy supports in grades K-3

# of families, caregivers served that are provided with information, resources, tools, trainings and/or teaching skills

 

Systems Improvement

# of policies promoted, enacted or modified to promote childhood success

# of community partners organized, led, and/or managed by your program

# of early childhood staff trained to provide quality programs, services

 

OUTCOMES  

 

% of children (0-5) served who achieve developmental milestones

% of children served who are proficient on school readiness assessments by the end of their kindergarten year

% of children (K-3) served reading at grade level

% of children (K-3) served who maintain satisfactory or improve school attendance

INDICATORS

 

Direct Supports and Services

# of elementary/middle/high school youth served who participate in school and/or community-based out-of-school time programs and/or receive individualized supports

# of youth served who receive job skills training

 

Systems Improvement

# of policies promoted, enacted, or modified to promote educational success

# of community partners organized, led, and/or managed by your program

# of youth development staff trained to provide quality programs, services

 

OUTCOMES

 

% of youth served who graduate high school on time

% of youth served who gain post-secondary employment, further education or credential

# of youth served (15-24) who gain employment

% of middle/high school youth served who earn passing grades in core subject areas

% of elementary/middle/high school youth served who maintain satisfactory or improve school attendance

% of middle/high school youth served who develop soft skills

% of youth served who transition from middle to high school on time

 

INDICATORS

 

Direct Supports and Services

# of individuals served participating in physical activity and/or healthy food access/nutrition programs

# of individuals served with access to healthcare services and supports

# of individuals served with access to healthcare insurance

 

Systems Improvement
# of policies promoted, enacted or modified to promote health

# of community partners organized, led, and/or managed by your program

# of health sector staff trained to deliver quality services

 

OUTCOMES

% of children/adults served who eat healthier, increase their physical activity, and/or move towards a healthy weight

% of babies served who experience healthy birth outcomes (e.g. celebrate their 1st birthday, carried to full term, and/or born at a healthy weight)

% of youth/adults served who avoid or reduce risk-taking behaviors

% of mothers served who access prenatal care

 

INDICATORS

 

Direct Supports and Services

# of individuals served participating in physical activity and/or healthy food access/nutrition programs

# of individuals served with access to healthcare services and supports

# of individuals served with access to healthcare insurance

 

Systems Improvement

# of policies promoted, enacted or modified to promote health

# of community partners organized, led, and/or managed by your program

# of health sector staff trained to deliver quality services

 

OUTCOMES

% of children/adults served who eat healthier, increase their physical activity, and/or move towards a healthy weight

% of babies served who experience healthy birth outcomes (e.g. celebrate their 1st birthday, carried to full term, and/or born at a healthy weight)

% of youth/adults served who avoid or reduce risk-taking behaviors

% of mothers served who access prenatal care